yakimavalleyhops:

Hop picker #yakimavalleyhops

They’re picking my fresh hops baby!

The piglets have received word from Boston that the Blueberry Berliner Weisse has now been bottled!

Look at that colour. Just look at it. We hearing it has a lemonade sourness and a crisp finish, which probably accounts for a nice low finishing gravity of close to 1.007.

If you didn’t catch the entry from a few weeks ago about our collaboration@ with Chris Rae, this is a sour mash test to see how close we can get to a true sour beer.

So far the piglets are trotting around in anticipation. More to come.

It’s finished, 6 weeks fermentation, 4.3% vol. and 2 hours of bottling time. So many high piglet hopes for this beer. Interesting ingredients, new techniques and yet tasting it, Legolas (the two legged piglet) and Perfect Piglet are left relatively unimpressed at bottling stage. 

As Legolas looks away in disappointment, it seems the pre-bottled beer has taken on all the bitterness of the orange caramel but left most of the orange flavor and aroma behind. Despite adding the dissolved caramel post secondary fermentation the aroma is subtle and the spiciness of the rye is the most dominant aspect of the flavor. 

Still, it’s always better to judge once it’s carbonated and in a pint glass, so we won’t shoot this down yet. Oh and one other thing, has anyone seen this kind of long lasting krausen floating after fermentation is complete? It looks like dried apple, and kind of gross. 

Uncertain times times ahead… It’s finished, 6 weeks fermentation, 4.3% vol. and 2 hours of bottling time. So many high piglet hopes for this beer. Interesting ingredients, new techniques and yet tasting it, Legolas (the two legged piglet) and Perfect Piglet are left relatively unimpressed at bottling stage. 

As Legolas looks away in disappointment, it seems the pre-bottled beer has taken on all the bitterness of the orange caramel but left most of the orange flavor and aroma behind. Despite adding the dissolved caramel post secondary fermentation the aroma is subtle and the spiciness of the rye is the most dominant aspect of the flavor. 

Still, it’s always better to judge once it’s carbonated and in a pint glass, so we won’t shoot this down yet. Oh and one other thing, has anyone seen this kind of long lasting krausen floating after fermentation is complete? It looks like dried apple, and kind of gross. 

Uncertain times times ahead…

It’s finished, 6 weeks fermentation, 4.3% vol. and 2 hours of bottling time. So many high piglet hopes for this beer. Interesting ingredients, new techniques and yet tasting it, Legolas (the two legged piglet) and Perfect Piglet are left relatively unimpressed at bottling stage.

As Legolas looks away in disappointment, it seems the pre-bottled beer has taken on all the bitterness of the orange caramel but left most of the orange flavor and aroma behind. Despite adding the dissolved caramel post secondary fermentation the aroma is subtle and the spiciness of the rye is the most dominant aspect of the flavor.

Still, it’s always better to judge once it’s carbonated and in a pint glass, so we won’t shoot this down yet. Oh and one other thing, has anyone seen this kind of long lasting krausen floating after fermentation is complete? It looks like dried apple, and kind of gross.

Uncertain times times ahead…

Ginger beer bottling at the Micro Pig Brewery this morning, and this bad boy packs a punch!

Professor Pig samples the first taste and man it has a strong, acidic ginger flavour but strangely no finishing kick. Somehow it’s fallen out of the beer during fermentation (I’m sure someone can reblog this and explain why) so I’m adding some habanero vodka I made about a year ago for wheat beer I made. Let’s just say the label’s accurate, this is dangerous material…

We want the capsicum to bring the heat but not a forest fire to our mouths, so we’re adding some drops to the sample glass to calculate the kick we want. I’m going for 10 drops in a 22oz bottle. 

To carbonate, I’m throwing in carbonation drops I’ve been wanting to use up (two drops in each) and stashing the bottles away for couple of weeks ready for an early September party. 

A 2.1% ginger beer should round out a Brooklyn summer nicely. Can’t wait! Ginger beer bottling at the Micro Pig Brewery this morning, and this bad boy packs a punch!

Professor Pig samples the first taste and man it has a strong, acidic ginger flavour but strangely no finishing kick. Somehow it’s fallen out of the beer during fermentation (I’m sure someone can reblog this and explain why) so I’m adding some habanero vodka I made about a year ago for wheat beer I made. Let’s just say the label’s accurate, this is dangerous material…

We want the capsicum to bring the heat but not a forest fire to our mouths, so we’re adding some drops to the sample glass to calculate the kick we want. I’m going for 10 drops in a 22oz bottle. 

To carbonate, I’m throwing in carbonation drops I’ve been wanting to use up (two drops in each) and stashing the bottles away for couple of weeks ready for an early September party. 

A 2.1% ginger beer should round out a Brooklyn summer nicely. Can’t wait! Ginger beer bottling at the Micro Pig Brewery this morning, and this bad boy packs a punch!

Professor Pig samples the first taste and man it has a strong, acidic ginger flavour but strangely no finishing kick. Somehow it’s fallen out of the beer during fermentation (I’m sure someone can reblog this and explain why) so I’m adding some habanero vodka I made about a year ago for wheat beer I made. Let’s just say the label’s accurate, this is dangerous material…

We want the capsicum to bring the heat but not a forest fire to our mouths, so we’re adding some drops to the sample glass to calculate the kick we want. I’m going for 10 drops in a 22oz bottle. 

To carbonate, I’m throwing in carbonation drops I’ve been wanting to use up (two drops in each) and stashing the bottles away for couple of weeks ready for an early September party. 

A 2.1% ginger beer should round out a Brooklyn summer nicely. Can’t wait!

Ginger beer bottling at the Micro Pig Brewery this morning, and this bad boy packs a punch!

Professor Pig samples the first taste and man it has a strong, acidic ginger flavour but strangely no finishing kick. Somehow it’s fallen out of the beer during fermentation (I’m sure someone can reblog this and explain why) so I’m adding some habanero vodka I made about a year ago for wheat beer I made. Let’s just say the label’s accurate, this is dangerous material…

We want the capsicum to bring the heat but not a forest fire to our mouths, so we’re adding some drops to the sample glass to calculate the kick we want. I’m going for 10 drops in a 22oz bottle.

To carbonate, I’m throwing in carbonation drops I’ve been wanting to use up (two drops in each) and stashing the bottles away for couple of weeks ready for an early September party.

A 2.1% ginger beer should round out a Brooklyn summer nicely. Can’t wait!

Tonight’s pint of choice. Excellent malt forward IPA. Rumplestiltspig dreams of a New Zealand and casting by Peter Jackson.

Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it  to sour for close to 24 hours. 

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour. 

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing

Last weekend the Micro Piglets took a road trip to Framingham, MA to take advantage of freshly picked blueberries and a home built all grain system. Christopher Rae and I tested sour mash technique from The Joy of Homebrew, by throwing in a half pound of milled grain at the end of a low temperature mash. Then covering the mash with a sheet of foil and leaving it to sour for close to 24 hours.

Convinced we’d be smelling some resembling a pile of sick the next morning, we were surprised to find a sweet smelling mash with a sharp, sour kick.

Mashing out at 175F, we pulled 3 pounds of freshly picked blueberries from the freezer (to break the skins over night) and let them thaw while we finished the 90 minute boil. Adding at the last minute of the boil, the berries quickly disintegrated but filling the wort with a truly smooth blueberry flavour.

Post cooling, we aerated and pitched a Dusseldorf Alt yeast (my recommendation to keep a small amount of body to the beer) and left overnight. Needless to say, if it doesn’t all pour out of my friends bucket, this beer could be amazing. A piglet treat in the late summer. :-)

Sour mash is a winner! Try it! Here’s the recipe I used:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/blueberry-berliner-weisse-1

Oh and no blow-off tube? Tell that to my beer making buddy… @bearmountainbrewing

The weekend keeps getting better. Lawson’s Finest Liquids - Knockout Blonde and sparging last night’s soured mash. More details on the homebrew later.

Brew time in Massachusetts tonight. A collaboration, sour mash Berliner Weisse. Yes that’s a Heady Topper!

The Piglets Collected their $49 winnings @brouwerijlane at the weekend. We’ve got all sorts of goodies, including Transmitter Brewing’s Brett Golden Ale. Rumpelstiltspig can’t wait to try it!

Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer. 

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it. 

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed.. Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer. 

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it. 

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed.. Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer. 

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it. 

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed.. Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer. 

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it. 

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed.. Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer. 

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it. 

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed..

Ginger beer brewing time, something that no Englishman or Micro Piglet should be without in a Brooklyn Summer.

After a some reading up and a chat with some homebrew buddies, we’ve created a 3 gallon recipe that uses 3lbs of fresh ginger, palm sugar and a couple of lemons. I like my ginger powerful and the alcohol content light, so I’m aiming for a 2.5% refreshing beer.

Once I’ve shaken the Micro Piglets off the ginger and started the 10 minute boil, I’m realizing the ginger might be a bit excessive. Still, time for the piglets to man up and deal with it.

I’m fermenting this with champagne yeast, so we should finish pretty much bone dry. The only residual sweetness should be from the added pound of dry malt extract I added. Here’s the recipe:

https://www.brewtoad.com/recipes/ginger-beer-58

So I think give this a couple of weeks and we’ll be bottling a nice little summer refresher for August. Fingers crossed..